Category Archives: Services

National Library Week Calendar of Events April 9-13th

Please come by and celebrate National Library Week with us at the Henry Whittemore Library April 9-13th!

April 9-23rdth:
– Displays of faculty and staff publications and art exhibit.
– Draw your Favorite Book Display.  Go to specific service desks to participate.
– National Libraries around the World Exhibit.

Monday, April 9th:
– Flash Mob Event – Come and participate on the Doyle Technology Patio 4:30-4:45pm.  Come early to get a spot!

Tuesday, April 10th:
– Pimp my book cart contest.  Please come and vote for your favorite decorated cart!
– Environmental Poetry Workshop and Reading 4:30-6:30pm in the Library Café.  Professor Sam Witt and Librarian Sandra Rothenberg

Thursday April 12th:
 Library Snapshot Day
– Book Club – Book of Fate by Brad Meltzer 12pm in the Library Café.

Friday, April 13th:
– Literary Cake Decorating Contest.  All welcome to participate in creating a Book related decorated cake.  Come by and assist us by voting for your favorite literary decorated cake. Voting 9:30-12:30pm.  At 1pm come by to partake of the yummy creations from 1-2pm. 
-Curriculum Library will host a story time for the pre-school children from the Child Development lab.

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Filed under Events, Exhibit Announcement, Library building, miscellaneous, Presentation, Services, staff

E-Readers Now Available!

Did you know that the Whittemore Library not only has e-books available, but they also have three different e-readers available for checkout? Neither did I!

Yes, it’s true! And it’s one of the library’s most interesting secrets. Behind the circulation desk rests these three e-readers, available for checkout to any of the University’s students or affiliates. I recently had a chance to take one of these e-readers for a test drive, and will tell you my thoughts below.

The e-reader, to my surprise, was not of the more well known brands like Amazon’s Kindle or Barnes and Noble’s Nook. Instead, it is a Sony e-reader, but that should not deter you. This one is one of the nicer ones I’ve seen, and also one of the heavier. This gives the e-reader itself a very sturdy quality that feels good in the hands. It doesn’t feel easily breakable, which is good, as library technology tends to take a beating over time.

The e-reader comes with a wall-charger and some directions to help get you started. Finding the power button was a little tricky, but after turning it on, everything was smooth sailing. The menus are clear and easily readable, though the touch screen isn’t quite as responsive to the touch of my finger as I would’ve liked. Thankfully, after a quick glance at the directions, I found a stylus hidden on the side of the device, and using that made the menus much more responsive. I recommend using the stylus at all times, both for the menus and to keep fingerprints off the screen.

There is a small learning curve that comes with every e-reader, and this often catches new readers off guard. When you turn the page, the screen has to refresh itself before the next page can be shown. During this refresh period, the screen quickly turns solid black, before loading the next set of text. This sounds intrusive, but it’s not as bad as it sounds, as the whole process takes less than a second. But it does require some getting used to at first, and can be quite distracting. Having had my own e-reader for close to a year, however, I can say that this doesn’t bother me at all.

Turning pages, however, took me a few tries to figure out. Since the screen itself is a touch screen, I assumed that to turn the page I would tap on the edges of the screen. Not so. You can turn the pages two ways. Either by swiping the stylus across the screen  right or left, or by pressing the buttons on the bottom of the device. I found the buttons to be a more reliable method of page-turning, as the swipe didn’t feel as responsive to me.

The e-reader comes preloaded with sixty-six full texts, all of which are “classics” available in the public domain. A student checking out the device cannot purchase or rent new texts, as that feature has been blocked. The librarian can add new texts to the device, and is always accepting requests. The books are all formatted properly, and read fine.

The e-reader does some have restrictions. It can only be checked out for two weeks, with a high late fee of $10 a day. It also cannot be renewed, and has to be back to the library with all parts in tact in order to be checked out again.

With that said, if you are looking for one specific book, it might be better to just get that book itself rather than e-reader, if nothing else than to avoid the chance of high-late fees. However, if you read books quickly, or are planning a trip, the e-reader would make a worthwhile option. It’s certainly a good device, works well, and offers a good selection of books. Just be careful of the late fees!

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Have You Found the IT HelpDesk?

If you haven’t been in the library lately, then you haven’t seen the big changes that have occurred.

And when I say big, I really mean it!

If you go down the stairs (or take the elevator) to the Lower Mezzanine (LM), you will find the new IT Help Desk, just finished construction early in the fall. No longer will you have to trek over to the basement of Hemenway Hall (though it’s still open if you prefer it) to have your laptop fixed; now you can have your troubles solved right in the library.

When you first come down the stairs, you will see the two newly built study rooms. They are fairly good sized, with comfortable chairs and a big table in the center. Inside each are two large flat-screen TVs, that can be hooked up to a laptop for group discussions. These TVs sound good, but unfortunately I feel that they have more use for slacking than studying. I have, however, seen a few groups in the room using them for presentations, so hopefully my fears are unfounded. While the rooms cannot be signed out yet, in the future that will become an option for groups who want to schedule study parties.

To your left from the study rooms is the IT desk itself. It’s brand new, and offers much more in the ways of both student comfort and ease of use. Instead of sitting behind a table in Hemenway, the IT workers sit behind a large desk with computer monitors that face the student, not the worker. These monitors can  be hooked up to the laptop the worker is fixing, so the student can see what is going on, or for demonstration purposes. No longer do you have to sit awkwardly while the worker clicks around on your laptop!

There are a number of comfortable chairs spread around the desk itself along with desks for study, and a few more TVs scattered around the area. It gives the place a feeling of comfort and relaxation, rather than just a spot to get your computer fixed. The desk itself is also far more welcoming than the room in Hemenway, with warm paneling and a clean exterior. It makes the desk a place that you actually want to visit, rather than a place to avoid.

The IT Desk has also made my life as a Circulation Desk Attendant (which is a fancy way of saying I check out books) much easier. Now, whenever a student has a laptop problem, often with printing, I can point them toward the desk. Not only that, but whenever a printer goes down in the library, someone from the IT Desk is always available to fix it. This means more working printers and less problems, which is always a good thing when you’re a college student.

With the addition of the IT Help Desk, the library is becoming far more of a one-stop-shop rather than just a holder of books. You can get some coffee, find a book to read, and get your laptop fixed without having to brave the great outdoors.

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Whittemore Library E-Book News

You can now download over 15,000 Project Gutenberg e-books from a variety of subjects – art, classic literature, history, cooking, poetry, horror, romance, science fiction and many more. You do not need to enter your library card to download the title. Your checkouts from the collection do not count against our regular checkout/lending options. More titles from Internet Archive are coming soon to our digital collection.

Below is the link to access the free public domain titles from Project Gutenberg and the instructions on how to download the titles:
http://digital.minlib.net/66F56BBD-6AC2-481E-955F-B20659B8536A/10/531/en/PublicDomainCollection.htm

To save a public domain EPUB to my computer…

On Windows…
1. Right-click the ‘Download’ link.
2. Select ‘Save Target As…’ or ‘Save Link As…’.
A dialog box is displayed that allows you to select a location on your computer to which to save the eBook.
3. Select a location.
4. Click ‘Save’.
The eBook is saved to your computer.

On Mac…
1. Press the ‘Control’ key and click the ‘Download’ link.
2. Select ‘Download Linked File As…’ or ‘Save Link As…’.
A dialog box is displayed that allows you to select a location on your computer to which to save the eBook.
3. Select a location.
4. Click ‘Save’.
The eBook is saved to your computer.

To add a public domain EPUB to the Adobe Digital Editions Library…
1. Open Adobe Digital Editions.
2. Click the Library icon in the upper left corner.
The Library is displayed.
3. Click the word ‘Library’ in the upper left corner.
4. Select ‘Add Item to Library’.
The ‘Select items to add to library’ dialog box is displayed.
5. Navigate to location to which you saved the eBook.
6. Select the eBook.

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Whittemore Library Resources for New Faculty

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LibLearn: Social Media at Whittemore Library

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Whittemore Library Orientation

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